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Latest News

Autumn is here and you need to check if you are 'Self Care' aware!

.. the Kids return to school, and the bugs arrive... No sooner do the kids start a new term than they pick up some lurgy or other. 

Coughs and colds, upset tummies, sickness bugs and headlice are among some of the main culprits, all of which can be treated at home with basic medicine available from your local pharmacy - no GP appointment or prescription required! Alternatively practice nurses, can help with lots of minor conditions which mean you don’t need to see a GP.

Remember that children can get between eight to 10 colds a year, and a cough can last at least three weeks before it starts to improve. Visiting your GP and getting medication on prescription, which could be easily bought over the counter, costs the local NHS approximately £45 each time you visit.

For further information on treatment of common childhood illnesses you can view or download the local NHS ‘Your Guide to Childhood Illnesses’.  A handy guide on common childhood illnesses for parents of children under six, it also has information about spotting the signs of a serious illness and local NHS services.

link to the guide is:
https://www.cambridgeshireandpeterboroughccg.nhs.uk/news-and-events/leaflets-and-guides/your-guide-to-childhood-illnesses

.. Young Adults are heading off to university

Whether you’re a fresher or heading into your final year, or a parent of a university student, we have a few basic health care tips for students.

1. Get the ACWY vaccine It protects against four different strains of the meningococcal bacteria that cause meningitis and blood poisoning (septicaemia): A, C, W and Y. Ask your GP practice for the vaccine.

2. Register with a GP when you get to university You never know when you might need medical help. If you take any regular medicines that are only available on prescription, for example the contraceptive pill, make sure you have enough to last the term or until you can register with a doctor close the university.

3. Take a first aid kit with you. It might not be the most exciting thing to pack but a first aid kit with plasters, painkillers, treat for upset stomachs, thermometer, tweezers, insect bite cream or spray and antiseptic cream is a good start.

.. Stock up your medicine cabinet

Autumn is a good time of the year to give your medicine cabinet a review, before winter comes. Below is a good basic first aid kit that all homes should have, it means you have the right things for basic first aid, and it’ll also save you a trip to the pharmacy if you’re not feeling well. You can stock up your first aid kit at the Surgery, and should include:

• plasters, tweezers, scissors and safety pins
• small, medium and large sterile gauze dressings and sticky tape
• at least two sterile eye dressings
• triangular bandages and disposable sterile gloves
• alcohol-free cleansing wipes and a thermometer
• skin rash cream such as hydrocortisone and antiseptic cream
• painkillers such as paracetamol , aspirin (not to be given to children under 16), or ibuprofen
• cough medicine and antihistamine tablets
• eye wash and eye bath

Have a look at our Advice for Young Patients page for information about going off to university and your health. There is also a good list on the dispensary services page for what to stock up your medicines cabinet with.

Have Your Say - Join Our Patient Group

Our next patient event will be 12.30 on Wednesday 24 January 2018 at the Surgery. We will be taking a look at visiting the Surgery from the perspective of a patient living with Dementia. This may be useful if you are a carer or have a family member who you would like to help.

August 2017 - Staff Update

Welcome to Dr Laura Grady our new Salaried GP and to Candice Yezek our new Practice Nurse.

Our September / October newsletter is now available from the link below

Sept & October Surgery Newsletter

Practice Leaflet 

Practice Leaflet August 2017

Friends and Family Test

Would you recommend our GP practice to friends and family if they needed similar care and treatment?
Please fill in a Friends and Family form available in the waiting room and drop it into the Surgery box, all responses are anonymous.

If you would like to give us feedback on our services, please feel free to email the surgery and add the subject Friends & Family within your text. Our email address is greatstaughton@nhs.net .

Getting to the Surgery

There is a Bus Service for Great Staughton, details are available from the following link: https://greatstaughton.com/2016/06/20/new-bus-service-to-huntingdon/

Booking Patient Transport for Hospital Appointments

Patients can book hospital transport or the Hospital will book your transport for you directly. For more details, please read item 16 below from further information section.

Prism: The new mental health service in your GP surgery

Prism (Primary care Service for Mental health) is a new service run by Cambridgeshire and Peterborough NHS Foundation Trust (CPFT) and launched in Great Staughton Surgery on 14 August.

The service, which runs Monday to Friday, 9am-5pm, has rolled out to 37 surgeries around the county. It provides specialist mental health support for GP surgeries so that patients with mental health conditions can access prompt advice and support, receive help in a community setting and experience a more joined-up approach to care.  Prism is for anyone aged between 17-65 years with mental health conditions and is based on a person’s needs rather than their diagnosis.

You can find out more about the service on our website here - http://www.cpft.nhs.uk/services/prism-service.htm 

Health News from the BBC and the NHS

BBC Health
NHS Choices Behind the Headlines
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